Français | Español | Português

A mixed flock: LGBTQIA+ narratives within ornithology

Tuesday, 8/10/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
Carly Aulicky, Native Prairies Association of Texas
Chad J. Wilhite, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Scott Anthony Taylor, University of Colorado
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Eric J. Tobin, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Miranda Wilkinson, The Jones Center at Ichauway, Georgia

What unique barriers and considerations are there for LGBTQIA+ identified ornithologists? We propose a LGBTQIA+ identified panel to discuss their work, experiences, and personal stories and how the intersection of their personal identities influences their career. Featured panelists will briefly share their unique experiences, then cover key discussion points such as how their LGBTQIA+ identity has influenced their relationship with their profession and/or research, how to effectively increase inclusion of diverse narratives within ornithology, and what effective allyship means for underrepresented individuals. Following the formal discussion, the panel will shift to open audience questions and discussion with the panelists for the remaining duration of the roundtable. It is our intention to establish an inclusive and welcoming space to discuss sometimes difficult topics related to personal identity within our profession. A panelist discussion will lead to increased awareness of the work conducted and the issues faced by queer ornithologists, which represent a hidden diversity of the ornithological community. The results from our conversation will be used to inform efforts to increase the inclusion and visibility of LGBTQIA+ ornithologists.

Birds of the World: Contribute your expertise!

Tuesday, 8/10/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
Brooke Keeney, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Paul Rodewald, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Shawn Billerman, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Tom Schulenberg, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Brian Sullivan, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Pam Rasmussen, Michigan State University
Scott Johnson, Towson University
Maya Wilson, Birds Caribbean
Fernando Medrano, ROC, Chile

Birds of the World (BOW) is the most comprehensive reference for the life histories of the World’s 10,700+ bird species and the web’s premiere resource for digital natural history. This roundtable seeks to engage ornithologists to contribute their information and expertise to species accounts. We will demonstrate recent advances of BOW species accounts, including new multimedia capabilities and integration of data products. A discussion will follow the demonstration with topics to include: the process of species account revisions and updates, contributions and authorship, community engagement, and suggestions for future developments.

Drone applications for ornithology

Thursday, 8/12/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
Dr. David Bird, McGill University: Drones Becoming a Popular Tool for Ornithologists
Rick Spaulding, ManTech International: The Wildlife Society Drone Working Group
Dr. Susan Ellis-Felege, University of North Dakota: Breeding Waterfowl Responses to Drone Surveys
Dr. Lindsay Young, Pacific Rim Conservation: Using Thermal-imaging Drones to Survey Cryptic Burrow-nesting Seabirds
Craig Gibson, The Crow Patrol: Using a Drone to Monitor a Winter Crow Roost
Dr. Page E. Klug, USDA APHIS WS NWRC: Drones as a Tool for Managing Birds in Conflict with Agriculture
Dr. Jared Elmore, Mississippi State & USDA: Systematic Map Effort of Using Drones to Monitor Birds
Dr. Elston Dzus: Conventional vs. Drone-assisted Nest Checks of Bald Eagles in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada
Dr. Morgan Pfeiffer, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, NWRC: Considerations for using UAS in bird dispersal

Ornithologists are relying on an ever-increasing suite of tools to answer questions and solve problems related to avian ecology. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, has exploded in popularity in ecological studies in general, and in ornithology in particular. Drones have many advantages over traditional research techniques. They eliminate safety risks associated with fixed-wing and helicopter surveys, reduce cost and disturbance, increase accuracy, and allow the collection of high-resolution data over large or otherwise inaccessible areas. Some of the major areas of application of drones that have emerged in avian ecology include, but are not limited to: 1) population surveys, including breeding colonies and non-breeding aggregations and the use of different types of sensors (e.g. visible, thermal IR); 2) individual nest inspections; 3) radio-tracking surveys involving the use of radio telemetry sensors; (4) acoustic surveys, involving the use of song-recording sensors; 5) avian habitat research and monitoring involving high-resolution 2D and 3D mapping and multi- and hyperspectral imaging; and 6) bird dispersal, either for nuisance birds or to deter birds from hazards. This Roundtable Discussion provides highlights of the use of drones in avian ecology and a forum for discussion among both experts and potential users of drones that may result in future research collaborations between ornithologists in academic, government, and private sectors.

Identifying and overcoming the challenges that hinder avian microbiome research

Wednesday, 8/11/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
We expect that many, if not all, of proposed speakers in our companion microbiome symposium will be participating in this roundtable. We list them here with the understanding that actual participation may vary depending on time/day of the roundtable. 

Elin Videvall, Postdoc, Brown University
Bill Karasov, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Kirk Klasing, Professor, University of California Davis
Sarah Hird, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
Marcella Baiz, Postdoc, Pennsylvania State University
Felipe Campos-Cerda, Postdoc, Instituto de Ecología-UNAM
Jennifer Houtz, PhD Student, Cornell University
Brian Trevelline, Postdoc, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Maurine Dietz, Research Associate, University of Groningen
Morgan Slevin, PhD Student, Florida Atlantic University
Sarah Knutie, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
Gabrielle Davidson, Postdoc, University of Cambridge
Pierce Hutton, PhD Student, Arizona State University
Priscilla San Juan, PhD Student, Stanford University
Maria Costantini, Postdoc, Smithsonian Institution
Kevin Kohl, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh
Mae Berlow, PhD Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Melissah Rowe, Assistant Professor, Netherlands Institute of Ecology

A recent surge in research has demonstrated that the microbiome—the archaeal, bacterial, fungal and viral communities residing on and inside organisms—profoundly influence host health and performance through their impacts on the immune system, digestion, development, and behavior. However, most of these investigations have focused on humans or model organisms. While research into roles that microbes play in the ecology and evolution of their hosts is a rapidly growing area, the importance of gut microbiome in birds is poorly understood. Therefore, we propose a roundtable discussion that brings together researchers that investigate avian host-microbe interactions, with the aim of identifying and addressing the challenges that impede research on the avian microbiome.

Meet the editors

Tuesday, 8/10/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
Catherine Lindell, Ornithological Applications Editor
Scott Sillett, Ornithology Editor
Mark Penrose, Managing Editor, AOS journals
Special Features Editor Kate Huyvaert and Senior Editors Wesley Hochachka, Christy Pruett, Paul Doherty, and Sabrina Taylor will also likely be in attendance.

Everyone is welcome to this session to meet the Editors-in-Chief, Senior Editors, and Managing Editor for the AOS journals, Ornithology and Ornithological Applications. This session will be particularly helpful for students and early career professionals. The editors will discuss what they are looking for in submitted manuscripts and how to increase the chances a manuscript will be reviewed favorably. After comments by the editors, the session will be devoted to questions from the audience.

Professional ethics town hall

Wednesday, 8/11/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
Jeff Brawn, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Jeanne Fair,  Los Alamos National Laboratory 
Katie Dugger, Oregon State University 
Corey Tarwater, University of Wyoming 
Rob Fleischer, Smithsonian 
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Reed Bowman, Archbold Biological Station.
Jen Walsh, Cornell University

The professional ethics town hall event is an annual “listening session” on the topics of professional ethics and professional responsibility relevant to ornithologists. All attendees are invited to participate to express their perspectives, discuss emerging topics, and voice their questions, concerns and suggestions about issues relevant to professional ethics. The town hall is organized by the AOS Professional Ethics Committee.

What “Open Science” means for publishing now and in the future

Thursday, 8/12/21: 4–5 p.m. EDT

Panelists
Sarah Andrus, Oxford University Press Publisher for AOS journals
Catherine Lindell, EIC Ornithological Applications
Scott Sillett, EIC Ornithology
Mark Penrose, Managing Editor of AOS journals

The editors-in-chief and managing editor of the AOS journals Ornithology and Ornithological Applications, and the publisher from Oxford University Press, will engage with conference attendees in this session. We will explore the implications of the advent of open science for publication of manuscripts, data, code, and other facets of the publishing process like preprint servers. We will discuss the benefits, costs, and potential ways to manage the costs, of open science.


Français

Une envolée mixte: récits de membres de la communauté LGBTQIA+ en ornithologie

Panélistes
Carly Aulicky, Native Prairies Association of Texas
Chad J. Wilhite, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Scott Anthony Taylor, University of Colorado
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Eric J. Tobin, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Miranda Wilkinson, The Jones Center at Ichauway, Georgia

Quels sont les obstacles et les considérations uniques pour les ornithologues qui s’identifient LGBTQIA+ ? Nous proposons un panel d’ornithologues LGBTQIA+ pour discuter de leur travail, de leurs expériences, de leurs histoires personnelles et de la manière dont leurs identités personnelles influencent leur carrière. Les panélistes partageront brièvement leurs expériences uniques, puis aborderont des points de discussion clés tels que la manière dont leur identité LGBTQIA+ a influencé leur relation avec leur profession et/ou leur recherche, la manière d’accroître efficacement l’inclusion diverse au sein de l’ornithologie, et ce que signifie une alliance inclusive pour les personnes sous-représentées. Après une discussion formelle, le comité passera à des questions ouvertes au public et à une discussion avec les panélistes pendant le reste de la table ronde. Notre intention est d’établir un espace inclusif et accueillant pour discuter de sujets parfois difficiles liés à l’identité personnelle au sein de notre profession. La discussion avec les panélistes permettra de mieux faire connaître le travail effectué et les problèmes rencontrés par les ornithologues queers, qui représentent une diversité cachée de la communauté ornithologique. Les résultats de notre conversation seront utilisés pour informer les efforts visant à accroître l’inclusion et la visibilité des ornithologues LGBTQIA+.

Les Oiseaux du Monde: Contribuez avec votre expertise!

Panélistes
Brooke Keeney, Lab d’ornithologie de Cornell
Paul Rodewald, Lab d’ornithologie de Cornell
Shawn Billerman, Lab d’ornithologie de Cornell
Tom Schulenberg, Lab d’ornithologie de Cornell
Brian Sullivan, Lab d’ornithologie de Cornell
Pam Rasmussen, Université de l’état de Michigan
Scott Johnson, Universiteé de Towson
Maya Wilson, Oiseaux des Caraïbes
Fernando Medrano, ROC, Chili

Les Oiseaux du Monde (BOW en anglais) est la référence la plus complète sur l’histoire naturelle de plus de 10 700 espèces d’oiseaux à travers le monde et la première ressource numérique d’histoire naturelle sur Internet. Cette table ronde vise à inciter les ornithologues à apporter leurs connaissances et leurs expertises aux descriptions des espèces d’oiseaux. Nous présenterons les récentes avancées des descriptions d’espèces d’oiseaux de BOW, notamment la nouvelle fonctionnalité multimédia et l’intégration des produits de données. Une discussion suivra la présentation et portera sur les sujets suivants : le processus de révision et de mise à jour des descriptions d’espèces, les contributions et l’identification des auteurs, l’engagement de la communauté et les suggestions pour les développements futurs.

L’utilisation de drones en ornithologie

Panélistes
Dr. David Bird, Université de McGill: Les drones deviennent un outil populaire pour les ornithologues
Rick Spaulding, ManTech International: Le groupe de travail sur les drones de la Wildlife Society
Dr. Susan Ellis-Felege, Université du Dakota du nord: Réponses des oiseaux nicheurs aux suivis par drone chez la sauvagine
Dr. Lindsay Young, Pacific Rim Conservation: Utilisation de drones à imagerie thermique pour recenser les oiseaux marins cryptiques nichant dans des terriers
Craig Gibson, The Crow Patrol: Utilisation d’un drone pour le suivi des sites de repos de corneilles en hiver
Dr. Page E. Klug, USDA APHIS WS NWRC: Les drones comme outil de gestion des oiseaux en conflit avec l’agriculture
Dr. Jared Elmore, État du Mississippi & USDA: Effort systématique de cartographie par l’utilisation de drones pour le suivi des oiseaux
Dr. Elston Dzus: Suivis conventionnels vs. assistés par drone des nids de pygargues à tête blanche dans le nord de la Saskatchewan, Canada
Dr. Morgan Pfeiffer, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, NWRC: Considérations sur l’utilisation des véhicules aériens sans pilote pour la dispersion des oiseaux.

Les ornithologues s’appuient sur une gamme toujours grandissante d’outils pour répondre aux questions et résoudre des problèmes en écologie aviaire. L’utilisation de véhicules aériens sans pilote, ou drones, a explosé en popularité dans les études en écologie, et en particulier en ornithologie. Les drones présentent de nombreux avantages par rapport aux techniques de recherche traditionnelles. Ils éliminent les risques de sécurité associés aux études menées par avion et par hélicoptère, réduisent les coûts et les perturbations des oiseaux, augmentent la précision et permettent la collecte de données à haute résolution sur des zones étendues ou autrement inaccessibles. Certains des principaux domaines d’application des drones qui ont vu le jour en écologie aviaire comprennent, entre autres, les domaines suivants 1) le suivi des populations, y compris les colonies de reproduction et les agrégations non reproductrices et l’utilisation de différents types de capteurs (p.ex., visible, IR thermique); 2) l’inspection individuelle des nids; 3) les suivi par télémétrie impliquant l’utilisation de récepteurs télémétriques; 4) les suivis acoustiques, impliquant l’utilisation de capteurs d’enregistrement de chants; 5) la recherche et le suivi de l’habitat des oiseaux impliquant la cartographie 2D et 3D à haute résolution et l’imagerie multi- et hyperspectrale; et 6) la dispersion des oiseaux, soit pour les oiseaux nuisibles, ou pour éloigner les oiseaux des zones de danger. Cette table ronde présente les points forts de l’utilisation des drones en écologie aviaire et constitue un forum de discussion entre les experts et les utilisateurs potentiels de drones, qui pourrait déboucher sur de futures collaborations de recherche entre les ornithologues des secteurs universitaires, publics et privés.

Identifier et surmonter les défis qui entravent la recherche sur le microbiome aviaire

Panélistes
Nous nous attendons à ce que la majorité des conférencières et conférenciers de notre symposium sur le microbiome proposés ci-dessous participent à cette table ronde. Nous les avons donc listées ci-dessous, en prenant en considération que leur participation peut varier en fonction de l’heure et de la journée de cette table ronde.

Elin Videvall, Post-doctorante, Université Brown
Bill Karasov, Professeur, Université de Wisconsin-Madison
Kirk Klasing, Professeur, Université de California Davis
Sarah Hird, Maître de conférences, Université de Connecticut
Marcella Baiz, Post-doctorante, Universiteé de l’État de Pennsylvanie
Felipe Campos-Cerda, Post-doctorant, Institut d’écologie-UNAM
Jennifer Houtz, Doctorante, Université Cornell
Brian Trevelline, Post-doctorant, Université Cornell Lab d’ornithologie
Maurine Dietz, Associée de Recherche, Université de Groningen
Morgan Slevin, Doctorante, Université de la Floride Atlantique
Sarah Knutie, Maître de conférences, Université du Connecticut
Gabrielle Davidson, Post-doctorante, Université de Cambridge
Pierce Hutton, Doctorant, Université de l’état de l’Arizona 
Priscilla San Juan, Doctorante, Université de Stanford
Maria Costantini, Post-doctorante, Institut Smithsonian
Kevin Kohl, Maître de conférences, Université de Pittsburgh
Mae Berlow, PhD Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Melissah Rowe, Assistant Professor, Netherlands Institute of Ecology

Une découverte récente dans le domaine de la recherche scientifique a permis de démontrer que le microbiome – les communautés d’archées, bactéries, champignons et virus retrouvées à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur des organismes vivants – influence profondément la santé et la performance de l’hôte, notamment en ce qui concerne le système immunitaire, la digestion, la croissance et le comportement de l’hôte. La plupart de ces recherches ont comme modèle l’humain ou d’autres espèces modèles couramment utilisées en recherche. Cependant, alors que la recherche sur le rôle des microbes dans l’écologie et l’évolution de leur hôte est en effervescence, celle du microbiome intestinal des oiseaux est encore peu connue à ce jour. De ce fait, nous proposons une discussion qui rassemblera plusieurs chercheuses et chercheurs dans le domaine des interactions hôte-microbes aviaires, qui aura pour but d’identifier et d’adresser les défis qui entravent la recherche sur le microbiome aviaire.

Rencontrez les rédacteurs

Panélistes
Catherine Lindell, Rédactrice en chef de l’Ornithological Applications
Scott Sillett, Rédacteur en chef de l’Ornithology
Mark Penrose, Directeur-rédacteur en chef des journaux AOS 
La rédactrice d’éléments spécifiques Kate Huyvaert et les rédactrices en chef principales et rédacteurs en chef principaux, Wesley Hochachka, Christy Pruett, Paul Doherty, et Sabrina Taylor seront également présentes et présents.

Tout le monde est bienvenu à cette séance de rencontre avec les rédactrices et rédacteurs en chef, rédactrices en chef principales et rédacteurs en chef principaux et directrices et directeurs de publication du journal de l’UAO (AOS), Ornithology et Ornithological Applications. Cette séance sera particulièrement pertinente pour les étudiants et les professionnels en début de carrière. Les rédacteurs discuteront des éléments recherchés que l’on retrouve généralement dans les articles publiés et comment augmenter les chances qu’un article soit révisé de façon favorable. Suite aux commentaires des rédactrices et rédacteurs, il y aura une séance consacrée aux questions de l’audience.

Encourager la diffusion et le partage de données pour favoriser une meilleure collaboration dans les sciences du déplacement

Panélistes
Jill Deppe, Initiative pour  les oiseaux migrateurs, Société Nationale d’Audubon
Peter Marra, Initiative environnementale de Georgetown
Sarah Davison, Institut de Max Planck du comportement animal & Université de l’état d’Ohio
Lesley Howes, Biologiste spécialiste du baguage des oiseaux, Service canadien de la faune, Environnement et Changement climatique Canada
Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Centre Migratoire des oiseaux, Institut Smithsonian en Conservation

Au cours des cents dernières années, le suivi du déplacement des oiseaux est passé de la technique de baguage d’oiseaux à la pose de petits émetteurs. C’est avec un effort soutenu que la communauté d’ornithologues a développé une nouvelle avancée dans le domaine de la science des déplacements des oiseaux sauvages. Les plateformes de partage de données reliés aux mouvements des oiseaux permettent de développer de nouvelles avancées pour la conservation aviaire. Ces plateformes permettent entre autres de compiler des données de plusieurs projets d’années différentes, de les intégrer aux nouveaux outils d’analyse et de les combiner à de multiples technologies et d’y ajouter des informations de sources différentes. Cette table ronde rassemblera plusieurs groupes d’ornithologues qui utilisent les données partagées sur ces plateformes ou les données collectées par des ornithologues sur suivi de population d’oiseaux pour améliorer leurs mesures de conservation. Nous couvrirons différents sujets et initiatives reliés à l’utilisation du partage de données à grande échelle pour la science du déplacement des oiseaux sauvages. Alors que la valeur de ces données publiques est maintenant bien établie, il sera question de discuter de ce qui a été accompli jusqu’à présent, des défis en cours, et des opportunités futures de ces données. Plus précisément, cette table ronde soulignera les approches qui ont révolutionné notre compréhension de l’écologie de la migration des petits oiseaux d’Amérique du Nord et autour du monde. Il sera aussi question de déterminer comment ces connaissances nouvellement acquises présentent de nouvelles opportunités pour la conservation aviaire au-delà des frontières.

Assemblée générale sur l’éthique professionnelle

Panélistes
Jeff Brawn – Université d’Illinois à Urbana-Champaign
Jeanne Fair –  Laboratoir national de Los Alamos
Katie Dugger- Université de l’état d’Oregon 
Corey Tarwater – Université de Wyoming 
Rob Fleischer – Smithsonian 
Kristen Covino – Universiteé de Loyola Marymount 
Reed Bowman – Station biologique d’Archbold
Jen Walsh – Université de Cornell

La réunion publique sur l’éthique professionnelle est une séance annuelle sur les thèmes de l’éthique professionnelle et de la responsabilité professionnelle concernant les ornithologues. Toutes les participantes et participants sont invités à participer afin d’exprimer leurs points de vue, de discuter de sujets émergents et de faire part de leurs questions, préoccupations et suggestions sur des sujets liés à l’éthique professionnelle. La réunion est organisée par le Comité d’éthique professionnelle de l’AOS.

Ce que “Science ouverte” signifie pour l’édition aujourd’hui et à l’avenir

Panélistes
Sarah Andrus, Éditrice de presse de l’université d’Oxford pour les journaux AOS
Catherine Lindell, EIC Ornithological Applications
Scott Sillett, EIC Ornithology

Mark Penrose, Directeur-rédacteur en chef pour les journaux AOS
Les rédactrices et rédacteurs en chef et le directeur en chef de la rédaction des revues Ornithology et Ornithological Applications de l’AOS, ainsi que l’éditrice de presse de l’université d’Oxford, dialogueront avec les participantes et participants à la conférence au cours de cette session. Nous explorerons les implications de l’avènement de la science ouverte pour la publication de manuscrits, de données, de codes et d’autres facettes du processus de publication comme les serveurs de préimpression. Nous discuterons des avantages, des coûts et des moyens potentiels de gérer les coûts de la science ouverte.


Español

Un rebaño mixto: narrativas LGBTQIA + dentro de la ornitología

Panelistas
Carly Aulicky, Native Prairies Association of Texas
Chad J. Wilhite, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Scott Anthony Taylor, University of Colorado
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Eric J. Tobin, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Miranda Wilkinson, The Jones Center at Ichauway, Georgia

¿Qué barreras y consideraciones únicas existen para los ornitólogos identificados como LGBTQIA +? Proponemos un panel identificado LGBTQIA + para discutir su trabajo, experiencias e historias personales y cómo la intersección de sus identidades personales influye en su carrera. Los panelistas destacados compartirán brevemente sus experiencias únicas, luego cubrirán puntos clave de discusión, como cómo su identidad LGBTQIA + ha influido en su relación con su profesión y / o investigación, cómo aumentar de manera efectiva la inclusión de diversas narrativas dentro de la ornitología y qué significa una alianza efectiva para los subrepresentados individuos. Después de la discusión formal, el panel pasará a preguntas abiertas de la audiencia y discusión con los panelistas durante el resto de la mesa redonda. Nuestra intención es establecer un espacio inclusivo y acogedor para discutir temas a veces difíciles relacionados con la identidad personal dentro de nuestra profesión. Una discusión de panelista conducirá a una mayor conciencia sobre el trabajo realizado y los problemas que enfrentan los ornitólogos queer, que representan una diversidad oculta de la comunidad ornitológica. Los resultados de nuestra conversación se utilizarán para informar los esfuerzos para aumentar la inclusión y la visibilidad de los ornitólogos LGBTQIA +.

Aves del Mundo: ¡Contribuya con su experiencia!

Panelistas
Brooke Keeney, Laboratorio de Ornitología de Cornell
Paul Rodewald, Laboratorio de Ornitología de Cornell
Shawn Billerman, Laboratorio de Ornitología de Cornell
Tom Schulenberg, Laboratorio de Ornitología de Cornell
Brian Sullivan, Laboratorio de Ornitología de Cornell
Pam Rasmussen, Universidad Estatal de Michigan
Scott Johnson, Universidad Towson
Maya Wilson, Birds Caribbean
Fernando Medrano, ROC, Chile

Aves del Mundo (BOW en inglés) es la referencia más completa a las historias de vida de las más de 10,700 especies de aves del mundo y el principal recurso de la web para la historia natural digital. Esta mesa redonda busca involucrar a los ornitólogos para que aporten su información y experiencia a los relatos de la especie. Demostraremos los avances recientes en las cuentas de especies BOW, incluidas las nuevas capacidades multimedia y la integración de productos de datos. Una discusión seguirá a la demostración con temas que incluirán: el proceso de revisión y actualización de la cuenta de la especie, contribuciones y autoría, participación de la comunidad y sugerencias para desarrollos futuros.

Aplicaciones de drones para ornitología

Panelistas
Dr. David Bird, Universidad McGill: Los drones se convierten en una herramienta popular para los ornitólogos
Rick Spaulding, ManTech International: Grupo de trabajo de drones de la Wildlife Society
Dr. Susan Ellis-Felege, Universidad de Dakota del Norte: Respuestas de reproducción de aves acuáticas a encuestas con drones
Dr. Lindsay Young, Pacific Rim Conservation: Uso de drones termográficos para inspeccionar aves marinas crípticas que anidan en madrigueras
Craig Gibson, The Crow Patrol: uso de un dron para monitorear un gallinero de invierno
Dr. Page E. Klug, USDA APHIS WS NWRC: Drones como herramienta para el manejo de aves en conflicto con la agricultura
Dr. Jared Elmore, Estado de Mississippi y USDA: Esfuerzo de mapas sistemáticos del uso de drones para monitorear aves
Dr. Elston Dzus: Verificaciones de nidos de águilas calvas en el norte de Saskatchewan, Canadá
Dr. Morgan Pfeiffer, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, NWRC: Consideraciones para el uso de UAS en la dispersión de aves

Los ornitólogos confían en un conjunto cada vez mayor de herramientas para responder preguntas y resolver problemas relacionados con la ecología de aves. El uso de vehículos aéreos no tripulados, o drones, ha aumentado enormemente en popularidad en los estudios ecológicos en general y en ornitología en particular. Los drones tienen muchas ventajas sobre las técnicas de investigación tradicionales. Eliminan los riesgos de seguridad asociados con los levantamientos de aviones y helicópteros, reducen los costos y las perturbaciones, aumentan la precisión y permiten la recopilación de datos de alta resolución en áreas extensas o inaccesibles. Algunas de las principales áreas de aplicación de los drones que han surgido en la ecología aviar incluyen, entre otras: 1) estudios de población, incluidas colonias reproductoras y agregaciones no reproductoras y el uso de diferentes tipos de sensores (por ejemplo, IR visible, térmico ); 2) inspecciones individuales de nidos; 3) estudios de seguimiento por radio que implican el uso de sensores de radiotelemetría; (4) estudios acústicos, que implican el uso de sensores de grabación de canciones; 5) investigación y monitoreo del hábitat de las aves que involucre mapeo 2D y 3D de alta resolución e imágenes multi e hiperespectrales; y 6) dispersión de aves, ya sea para aves molestas o para disuadir a las aves de los peligros. Esta Mesa Redonda de discusión ofrece aspectos destacados del uso de drones en la ecología aviar y un foro de discusión entre expertos y usuarios potenciales de drones que pueden resultar en futuras colaboraciones de investigación entre ornitólogos de los sectores académico, gubernamental y privado.

Identificar y superar los desafíos que obstaculizan la investigación del microbioma aviar

Panelistas
Esperamos que muchos, si no todos, de los oradores propuestos en nuestro simposio de microbioma participen en esta mesa redonda. Los enumeramos aquí con el entendimiento de que la participación real puede variar según la hora/día de la mesa redonda.

Elin Videvall, Postdoc, Brown University
Bill Karasov, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Kirk Klasing, Professor, University of California Davis
Sarah Hird, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
Marcella Baiz, Postdoc, Pennsylvania State University
Felipe Campos-Cerda, Postdoc, Instituto de Ecología-UNAM
Jennifer Houtz, PhD Student, Cornell University
Brian Trevelline, Postdoc, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Maurine Dietz, Research Associate, University of Groningen
Morgan Slevin, PhD Student, Florida Atlantic University
Sarah Knutie, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
Gabrielle Davidson, Postdoc, University of Cambridge
Pierce Hutton, PhD Student, Arizona State University
Priscilla San Juan, PhD Student, Stanford University
Maria Costantini, Postdoc, Smithsonian Institution
Kevin Kohl, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh
Mae Berlow, PhD Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Melissah Rowe, Assistant Professor, Netherlands Institute of Ecology

Un aumento reciente de investigaciones ha demostrado que el microbioma—las comunidades de arqueas, bacterias, hongos y virus que residen en los organismos y dentro de ellos—influye profundamente en la salud y el rendimiento del huésped a través de sus impactos en el sistema inmunológico, la digestión, el desarrollo y el comportamiento. Sin embargo, la mayoría de estas investigaciones se han centrado en seres humanos u organismos modelo. Si bien la investigación sobre los roles que desempeñan los microbios en la ecología y la evolución de sus huéspedes es un área de rápido crecimiento, la importancia del microbioma intestinal en las aves no se comprende bien. Por lo tanto, proponemos una mesa redonda que reúna a investigadores que estudian las interacciones entre el huésped aviar y microbio, con el objetivo de identificar y abordar los desafíos que impiden la investigación sobre el microbioma aviar.

Conoce a los editores

Panelistas
Catherine Lindell, editora de Ornithological Applications
Scott Sillett, editor de Ornithology
Mark Penrose, editor en jefe, revistas de AOS
La editora de artículos especiales Kate Huyvaert y los editores senior Wesley Hochachka, Christy Pruett, Paul Doherty y Sabrina Taylor probablemente también estarán presentes.

Todos son bienvenidos a esta sesión para conocer a los editores en jefe, los editores principales y el editor en jefe de las revistas de AOS, Ornitología y Aplicaciones Ornitológicas. Esta sesión será particularmente útil para estudiantes y profesionales que inician su carrera. Los editores discutirán lo que buscan en los manuscritos enviados y cómo aumentar las posibilidades de que un manuscrito sea revisado favorablemente. Después de los comentarios de los editores, la sesión se dedicará a las preguntas de la audiencia.

Datos abiertos en la ciencia del movimiento: redes colaborativas y oportunidades

Panelistas
Jill Deppe, Migratory Bird Initiative, National Audubon Society
Peter Marra, Georgetown Environmental Initiative
Sarah Davison, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior & Ohio State University
Lesley Howes, Bird Banding Biologist, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment and Climate Change Canada
Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Durante los últimos cien años, los avances en el seguimiento de los movimientos de las aves han progresado desde la recuperación de bandas hasta el uso de pequeños dispositivos de seguimiento. Un gran y creciente esfuerzo de la comunidad ornitológica ha ayudado a abrir una nueva frontera en la ciencia del movimiento y oportunidades nuevas y emocionantes. Los modelos de datos abiertos para los datos de movimiento de aves brindan nuevas oportunidades adicionales para avanzar en la conservación de las aves al combinar datos de proyectos y años, exponer los datos a nuevas herramientas analíticas y combinar múltiples tecnologías y fuentes de información. Esta mesa redonda reunirá a grupos que utilizan datos abiertos o la recopilación de datos de ornitólogos que rastrean aves para avanzar en su conservación. Cubriremos una variedad de temas e iniciativas relacionados con el uso de datos abiertos en la ciencia del movimiento. Si bien el valor de los datos abiertos está bien establecido, discutiremos qué se ha logrado, qué desafíos aún están presentes y qué oportunidades puede deparar el futuro. En particular, la mesa redonda destacará cómo estos enfoques están revolucionando la comprensión de la ecología de la migración de las aves pequeñas en América del Norte y, en última instancia, en todo el mundo, y cómo este conocimiento adquirido presenta nuevas oportunidades para la conservación de aves a través de las fronteras.

Consejo de ética profesional

Panelistas
Jeff Brawn, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Jeanne Fair,  Los Alamos National Laboratory 
Katie Dugger, Oregon State University 
Corey Tarwater, University of Wyoming 
Rob Fleischer, Smithsonian 
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Reed Bowman, Archbold Biological Station
Jen Walsh, Cornell University

El evento anual del consejo de ética profesional es una sesión en la que se abordan temas referentes a la ética profesional y la responsabilidad profesional como ornitólogos. Todos los asistentes están invitados a expresar sus perspectivas, discutir los temas emergentes, así como a expresar sus dudas, preocupaciones y sugerencias sobre los problemas relevantes para la ética profesional. El consejo es organizado por el Comité de Ética Profesional de la AOS.

Que significa la “ciencia abierta” para las publicaciones de ahora y del futuro

Panelistas
Sarah Andrus, Oxford University Press editor para AOS journals
Catherine Lindell, EIC Ornithological Applications
Scott Sillett, EIC Ornithology
Mark Penrose, Jefe de redacción en AOS journals

Los editores en jefe y el jefe de redacción de las revistas de la AOS Ornithology y Ornithological Applications y el editor de Oxford University Press, se relacionarán con los asistentes en esta sesión donde exploraremos las implicaciones de la llegada de la ciencia abierta para la publicación de manuscritos, datos, código y otras facetas del proceso de publicación como los servidores de preimpresión. Discutiremos los beneficios, costos y las posibles formas de administrar los costos de la ciencia abierta.


Português

Um bando misto: narrativas LGBTQIA+ dentro da ornitologia

Palestrantes
Carly Aulicky, Native Prairies Association of Texas
Chad J. Wilhite, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Scott Anthony Taylor, University of Colorado
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Eric J. Tobin, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Miranda Wilkinson, The Jones Center at Ichauway, Georgia

Quais são as barreiras e considerações únicas enfrentadas pelos ornitólogos que se identificam LGBTQIA+? Nós propomos uma mesa-redonda para que as pessoas LGBTQIA+ discutam seu trabalho, experiências e histórias pessoais, e como a interseção da identidade pessoal influencia sua carreira. Os palestrantes compartilharão brevemente suas experiências únicas e então abordarão pontos chave de discussão, como por exemplo, como sua identidade LGBTQIA+ influenciou sua relação com a profissão e/ou pesquisa, como aumentar efetivamente a inclusão de narrativas diversas na ornitologia, e o que alianças efetivas significam para os indivíduos sub-representados. Após a discussão formal, a plenária passará para as perguntas da audiência e discussão com os palestrantes, pelo tempo restante da mesa-redonda. Nossa intenção é propiciar um espaço inclusivo e acolhedor para discussão de assuntos difíceis relacionados com a identidade pessoal dentro de nossa profissão. Uma discussão em mesa-redonda nos levará a um aumento da conscientização sobre o trabalho conduzido e sobre as dificuldades enfrentadas por ornitólogos queer, que representam uma diversidade oculta da comunidade ornitológica. Os resultados de nossa conversa serão usados para informar os esforços necessários para aumentar a inclusão e a visibilidade dos ornitólogos LGBTQIA+.

Aves do Mundo: Contribua com sua experiência!

Palestrantes
Brooke Keeney, Laboratório de Ornitologia de Cornell
Paul Rodewald,  Laboratório de Ornitologia de Cornell
Shawn Billerman,  Laboratório de Ornitologia de Cornell
Tom Schulenberg,  Laboratório de Ornitologia de Cornell
Brian Sullivan,  Laboratório de Ornitologia de Cornell
Pam Rasmussen, Universidade Estadual do Michigan
Scott Johnson, Universidade Towson
Maya Wilson, Aves Caribenhas (Birds Caribbean)
Fernando Medrano, ROC, Chile

Aves do Mundo (Birds of the World – BOW, em inglês) é a referência mais completa para a história de vida das mais de 10.700 espécies de aves do mundo e é o principal recurso da web para a história natural digital. Esta mesa-redonda busca engajar ornitólogos a contribuir com informação e expertise nas fichas das espécies. Nós demonstraremos avanços recentes nas fichas de espécies no BOW, incluindo novas capacidades de multimídia e integração de produtos de dados. Uma discussão ocorrerá após a demonstração, com os seguintes tópicos: o processo de revisão e atualização de fichas de espécies, contribuições e autorias, engajamento da comunidade e sugestões para futuros desenvolvimentos.

Aplicações de drones para a Ornitologia

Palestrantes
Dr. David Bird, Universidade McGill: Drones se tornando uma ferramenta popular para ornitólogos
Rick Spaulding, ManTech International: O grupo de trabalho de drone da ‘Wildlife Society’
Dra. Susan Ellis-Felege, Universidade de Dakota do norte: Respostas de aves aquáticas reprodutivas a levantamentos com drone
Dra. Lindsay Young, Pacific Rim Conservation: Uso de drones de imagem termal em levantamentos de aves marinhas crípticas que nidificam em cavidades
Craig Gibson, The Crow Patrol: Uso de drone para monitoramento de ‘Winter Crow Roost’ (ploei/abrigo de corvos no período de inverno)
Dra. Page E. Klug, USDA APHIS WS NWRC: Drones como uma ferramenta para manejo de aves em conflito com a agricultura
Dr. Jared Elmore, Estado do Mississippi & USDA: Esforço de mapas sistemáticos do uso de drones para monitoramento de aves
Dr. Elston Dzus: Checagem de ninhos de águias-carecas de forma tradicional vs. com drones, no norte de Saskatchewan, Canadá
Dra. Morgan Pfeiffer, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, NWRC: Considerações sobre o uso de UAS para dispersão de aves

Ornitólogos contam com um número crescente de ferramentas para responder questões e resolver problemas relacionados à ecologia das aves. O uso de veículos aéreos não tripulados, ou drones, se popularizou em estudos ecológicos em geral, e particularmente na ornitologia. Drones possuem muitas vantagens quando comparados a técnicas tradicionais de pesquisa. Eles eliminam riscos de segurança associados a levantamentos com aviões e helicópteros, reduzem os custos e os distúrbios, aumentam a precisão e permitem a captura de dados com alta resolução em áreas grandes ou até mesmo inacessíveis. Algumas das principais áreas de aplicação de drones que surgiram na ecologia de aves incluem, entre outras: 1) levantamentos populacionais, incluindo colônias reprodutivas e agregações não reprodutivas, e o uso de diferentes tipos de sensores (ex: visível, infravermelho termal); 2) inspeções de ninhos individuais; 3) levantamentos de rastreamento por rádio, envolvendo o uso de rádio telemetria; 4) levantamentos acústicos, envolvendo o uso de sensores de gravação de sons; 5) pesquisa e monitoramento do habitat das aves, envolvendo mapeamento 2D e 3D de alta resolução e imageamento multi- e hiperespectrais; e 6) dispersão de aves, tanto para aves que estejam causando incômodo, como para dissuadir aves de algum perigo. Essa discussão em mesa-redonda apresenta destaques do uso de drones na ecologia de aves e provê um fórum para discussão entre especialistas e potenciais usuários de drones, que pode resultar em futuras colaborações de pesquisa entre ornitólogos nos setores acadêmico, governamental e privado.

Identificação e superação dos desafios que dificultam a pesquisa do microbioma aviário

Palestrantes
Esperamos que muitos, se não todos, palestrantes propostos nesse simpósio estejam participando desta mesa redonda. Os listamos aqui com o entendimento de que a participação pode variar dependendo do horário/dia da mesa redonda.

Elin Videvall, Pós-doutorado, Universidade de Brown
Bill Karasov, Professor, Universidade de Wisconsin-Madison
Kirk Klasing, Professor, Universidade da Califórnia Davis
Sarah Hird, Assistente de Professor, Universidade de Connecticut
Marcella Baiz, Pós-doutorado, Universidade do Estado da Pennsylvania
Felipe Campos-Cerda, Pós-doutorado, Instituto de Ecologia-UNAM
Jennifer Houtz, Estudante de Pós-doutorado, Universidade de Cornell
Brian Trevelline, Pós-doutorado, Laboratório de Ornitologia Cornell
Maurine Dietz, Associado a Revista, Universidade de Groningen
Morgan Slevin, Estudante de Pós-Doutorado, Universidade do Atlântico Florida
Sarah Knutie, Assistende de Professor, Universidade de Connecticut
Gabrielle Davidson, Pós-doutorado, Universidade de Cambridge
Pierce Hutton, Estudante de Pós-Doutorado, Universidade do Estado do Arizona
Priscilla San Juan, Estudante de Pós-Doutorado, Universidade de Stanford
Maria Costantini, Pós-doutorado, Instituição Smithsonian
Kevin Kohl, Assistente de Professor, Universidade de Pittsburgh
Mae Berlow, PhD Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Melissah Rowe, Assistant Professor, Netherlands Institute of Ecology

Uma onda recente de pesquisas demonstrou que o microbioma- as comunidades arqueais, bacterianas, fúngicas e virais residentes dentro dos organismos- influenciam profundamente a saúde e o desempenho do hospedeiro através de seus impactos no sistema imunológico, na digestão, desenvolvimento e comportamento. No entanto, a maioria dessas investigações se concentrou em humanos ou organismos modelo. Embora a pesquisa sobre os papéis que os parasitas desempenham na ecologia e evolução de seus hospedeiros seja de um crescimento rápido, a importância do microbioma no intestino das aves é mal compreendida. Por isso, propomos uma mesa redonda que reúnam pesquisadores que investiguem interações entre hospedeiros e parasitas aviários, com o objetivo de identificar e enfrentar os desafios que impedem a pesquisa sobre o microbioma aviário.

Conheça os editores

Palestrantes
Catharine Lindell, Editora da Applications Ornitology
Scott Sillet, Editor da Ornithology
Mark Penrose, Editor-Chefe, Jornal AOS
A editora de recursos especiais Kate Huyvaert e os editores seniores Wesley Hochachka, Christy Pruett, Paul Doherty e Sabrina Taylor provavelmente também estarão presentes.

Todos são bem-vindos a esta sessão para conhecer os editores chefes, editores Seniores e o editor chefe dos Jornais AOS, Ornithology e Ornithology Application. Esta sessão será particularmente útil para estudantes e profissionais em início de carreira. Os editores discutirão o que buscam nos manuscritos submetidos e como aumentar as chances de um manuscrito ser aceito. Após os comentários dos editores, a sessão será dedicada a perguntas da plateia.

Dados abertos na ciência do movimento: Redes colaborativas e oportunidades

Palestrantes
Jill Deppe, Migratory Bird Initiative, National Audubon Society
Peter Marra, Georgetown Environmental Initiative
Sarah Davison, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior & Ohio State University
Lesley Howes, Bird Banding Biologist, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment and Climate Change Canada
Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Nos últimos cem anos, os avanços no rastreamento dos movimentos das aves progrediram desde a recuperação de bandas até o uso de pequenos dispositivos de rastreamento. Um grande e crescente esforço da comunidade ornitológica ajudou a conduzir uma nova fronteira na ciência do movimento com novas e emocionantes oportunidades. Tanto modelos de dados abertos quanto de dados de deslocamento de aves, recentemente adquiriram oportunidades para avançar na conservação, reunindo dados anuais de todos os projetos, expondo a novas ferramentas analíticas, combinando múltiplas tecnologias e fontes de informação. Esta mesa redonda reunirá grupos que estão usando dados abertos ou a coleta de dados de ornitólogos que rastreiam aves para ajudar em sua conservação. Abordaremos uma série de tópicos e iniciativas relacionadas ao uso de dados abertos na ciência do movimento. Embora os valores dos dados abertos estejam bem estabelecidos, discutiremos o que foi realizado, quais desafios ainda estão presentes e quais oportunidades se podem ter no futuro. Em particular, a mesa redonda destacará como essas abordagens estão revolucionando a compreensão da ecologia migratória de pequenas aves da América do Norte, no mundo, e como esse conhecimento adquirido apresenta novas oportunidades de conservação de aves através das fronteiras.

Conselho de ética profissional

Palestrantes
Jeff Brawn, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Jeanne Fair, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Katie Dugger, Oregon State University
Corey Tarwater, University of Wyoming 
Rob Fleischer, Smithsonian 
Kristen Covino, Loyola Marymount University
Reed Bowman, Archbold Biological Station
Jen Walsh, Cornell University

O evento do conselho de ética profissional é uma sessão anual em que se abordam  tópicos acerca da ética profissional e da responsabilidade profissional relevante aos ornitólogos. Todos os participantes são convidados a participar e expressar suas perspectivas, discutir tópicos emergentes e expressar suas dúvidas, preocupações e sugestões sobre questões relevantes à ética profissional. O conselho é organizado pelo Comitê de Ética Profissional da AOS.

O que “Ciência Aberta” significa para as publicações agora e no futuro

Palestrantes
Sarah Andrus, Oxford University Press Publisher for AOS journals
Catherine Lindell, EIC Ornithological Applications
Scott Sillett, EIC Ornithology
Mark Penrose, Managing Editor of AOS journals

Os editores-chefe, e chefe de redação das revistas AOS Ornithology e Ornithological Applications, e a editora da Oxford University Press, se envolverão com os participantes da conferência nesta sessão. Exploraremos as implicações da chegada da ciência aberta para a publicação de manuscritos, dados, códigos e outras facetas do processo de publicação, tais como os servidores de pré-impressão. Discutiremos os benefícios, custos e formas potenciais de gerenciar os custos da ciência aberta.

Special thanks to our conference supporters